Easter Eggs

firstimperialegg
Once you dye the eggs for Easter they don’t contain any cholesterol anymore, or so goes the saying, right? Well, I don’t know about the nutritional value of Easter eggs but I do no that Easter is almost the only time of the year when I eat hard boiled eggs. It’s just something I usually don’t enjoy but since it matches the season and makes sense within Christian tradition I will crack open quite a few that Easter weekend.

So why have Christians adopted the egg for Easter? – It is a dead rock that comes to life!
An egg looks a lot like a rock that could be rolled in front of Jesus’ tomb. But when you give it some time eventually it will give way to life: When that baby chick manages to get its beak through the shell, when it eventually cracks it open all the way and makes its way out: Here is you symbol for resurrection that follows a time of death in that “rock”.

Eventually people fell in love with the egg for Easter and they started making them prettier: From simple finger paint to Fabergé eggs you can spend pennies or thousands of dollars on your egg collection. That’s where things get trickier: What does that have to do with the death and resurrection of our Lord and Savior? Isn’t that pure pleasure that does not match this solemn season? – Well actually, the solemn season of Lent is precisely over on Easter: For the first time since Mardi Gras, tradition allows the consumption of eggs, for the first time in seven weeks joy is the reason of celebration and chocolate eggs makes perfect sense. Christ is risen! Can you think of a greater joy? – It makes sense to take an ancient symbol and transform it into something fun, fresh, beautiful and yummy.

Heart Promises

Imagine people didn’t have a defect that you need to fix.
Imagine people didn’t need you to share your wisdom.
“No longer shall they teach one another, or say to each other, “Know the Lord,”
for they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest”

A Sermon for the Fifth Sunday in Lent 2015 based on Jeremiah 31:31-34 and John 12:20-33.

Expectation Management

The first official announcement for the 2016 presidential ticket of a major party is now on the books. Campaign season has officially begun. And like always we will hear a whole slate of people announcing their candidacy for their party ticket. And every single one of them will promise to do better than anyone else. They may promise to do away with whatever a predecessor may have done or they may promise to continue down the same path. “With me things are going to get a lot better.” They all have to say something to that effect because in the highest government executive office, we the people want someone who can get things done.

Israel had a lot of expectations for their new leader as well. For generations the land had been occupied by the Romans. There had always been revolts trying to cast off that yoke. Uprisings were commonplace and there was a lot of hope that some day a great strong leader may emerge and kick out the Romans once and for all. Somebody yelling: “With me things are going to get a lot better.” A strong leader who can get things done, who can fight and win our wars and restore liberty and justice for all. Maybe this concept of ancient Israel still applies today: Candidates still want to be the Messiah who saves the day. That’s why they promise heaven on earth if you just vote for them.

Well, here is what happened back then: Jesus was nominated to be the new king of the Jews. The media of the day had high expectations of this new and upcoming star. They wanted him to be the mighty warrior to restore King David’s Empire. They wanted him to lead the people into battle and free Jerusalem and restore Israel’s independence. News reports came in that he may join the Passover festivities in the capital this year. So reporters lined up along the main drag that led into town, vendors set up their booths with fan memorabilia, excitement was building. The people got curious: What’s going on? Who’s coming? What is this all about? Oh – a rally against the Romans? – Sign me up! Finally his presence was announced: Jesus has entered the final stretch and will be visible soon! What’s he gonna look like? Heavy armor? A mighty horse? Troops following behind him, well trained and equipped to march into the fight? Maybe even before the festival is over? Can he get this done swiftly and forcefully? Go Jesus! Go Jesus! Go Jesus!

Then he turns around the corner so everybody can see him in all his glory – sitting on a donkey!? And all of a sudden everybody starts realizing that their expectations had been off. When King David sent his son Solomon to his accession to the throne he had him ride on a donkey (1 Kings 1:33): No war machine, no military parade. The king of the Jews has always been a king of humility. What if our 2016 candidates announced like that: “Don’t expect too much from me. I’m not bringing anything special to the table. Things will not get a lot better because of me. I would just like to play my part in the system.”

What if we would manage our exceptions in a way that would enable us to live the life we have?
What if would would hope for fulfillment in our current situation without radical transformation?
What is life weren’t always all exciting but sometimes just hard work that never seems to end?
Because let’s not forget that the same crowd that yells “Hosannah!” today is bound to yell “Crucify him!” in just a little while.

Funeral Services for Rosa Bolte

Funeral Services for Rosa Bolte will be held on Monday, March 23, 2015 at St. John’s United Church of Christ, in Rosenberg, Texas with the Rev. Daniel Haas officiating.  Her burial will be immediately following the funeral service at Davis-Greenlawn Memorial Park in Rosenberg.  A reception will follow in the Parish Hall at St. John’s UCC.

Visitation will be held Sunday, March 22 from 5:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. at Davis-Greenlawn Funeral Home in Rosenberg.

Please keep her family in your thoughts and prayers.

Rich in Love

Did God really send snakes to kill God’s people? What kind of parent would do that?

A Sermon for the Fourth Sunday in Lent 2015 based on Numbers 21:4-9 and John 3:14-21.

A Celebration of Individualism

“Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me.”
(Psalm 51:10 – Watchword for the Week of Sunday 22 March 2015)

Me, me, and me! Unapologetically me! The Psalmist is not afraid in just one verse to three times refer to himself. He doesn’t care about the interconncetedness of all beings. He’s not worried about the state of the church or the state of the nation. He doesn’t want to feed the hungry, to clothe the naked, or to care for the widow, or the alien or the orphan. He prays for his own benefit. He doesn’t ask for kingdom come and thy will be done, no, it’s all about me, myself, and I!

That’s where religion takes place: In an individual’s heart. It’s a place where God has spoken from the beginning. Individualism is not a bad thing. God calls prophets and apostles, not committees and representatives. No corporation, no institution, no state, no church, can live if it does not have individuals that take care of the logs in their own eyes before getting into everybody else’s business. “Create in me a clean heart, O God” also means: I am in desperate need of cleaning because it’s not pretty in there. Give me a fresh start this Lent – like a spiritual spring cleaning.

Sometimes the shortest word in a verse has the biggest impact. Here it is certainly the humble a: “put a new and right spirit within me.” It implies that there is a multitude of new and right spirits to be had. For me, I need only one of those for myself. My way is not the highway and if I think my path is the straight and narrow I can be certain that the God of hosts has a host of other paths that are just as viable. The me right next to me, the me across the street or on the other side of the globe has their own journey just as I do.

Cosmic Law

The biggest disease today is not leprosy or tuberculosis, but rather the feeling of being unwanted. (Mother Teresa)

A Sermon for the Third Sunday in Lent 2015 based on Exodus 20:1-17 and John 2:13-22.