Gesundheit


When I sneeze one thing really gets me every time – someone responding with a big, fat, friendly “GESUNDHEIT!” In a context where I do not expect to hear my native German I am caught by surprise. Most people will say “God bless you!” anyway. After a little research I found that the ritual of blessing someone after a sneeze dates back to the plague of 590 AD. Pope Gregory I ordered that everyone receive an instant special blessing after they sneezed. A sneeze was one of the early symptoms and so the church tried to do its part in containing the epidemic. The blessing after a sneeze is – not surprisingly – a prayer for Gesundheit i.e. health.

“Bless the LORD, O my soul, and do not forget all his benefits.”
(Psalm 103:2 – Watchword for the Week of Sunday 14 September 2014)
Blessing one another sounds like an easy thing to do but this word commands us to bless God. How can we do that? Shouldn’t that be the other way around? We need God’s blessing! God is Almighty! How could we tiny, imperfect creatures possibly bless the Creator of heaven and earth?

What is it we actually do when we bless one another or when we ask God to bless us?
It’s about wishing someone well: May your health get better.
It’s about hoping the best for someone: I wish you luck.
It’s about supporting someone: That’s a good cause. I’ll help you.

Can you see the picture? God really does need our blessing. We are God’s hands and feet in this world. If we are not here to spread faith, hope and love, who is? We need to help God and support God’s ministry. And we should also want God to feel well. After all can you imagine what that would look like if the creator of heaven and earth were to sneeze? Bless God!

Jesus in my Stomach

The way to someone’s heart is through their stomach. Yes, I do believe that is true for all genders alike. Who wouldn’t enjoy a nice dinner? God has known that for, well, probably eternity. The love relation between Jesus Christ and us has always had food in its center: the wedding at Cana, the 5000, the last supper, you name it. God’s love has been brought to us through our stomachs. The lesson learned here is this: Body, mind and soul are one. Loving relationships depend on all three to flourish.

 

At times the church has forgotten that and started singing: “Lord I want to be a Christian in my heart!” Jesus is being reduced to a feeling. “As long as I have Jesus in my heart…” or so goes the excuse. That heart-felt faith all too often serves as an escape from the harshness of life. That Jesus is sweet and provides sanctuary. That Jesus is there to fill an emotional gap when life doesn’t give the satisfaction people were hoping for.

.

.

In Western culture we have gotten used to separating body, mind and soul. Aristotle introduced us to a distinction that was never intended to turn into a division. No, love is not limited to stomach and heart. By the way, when you read “heart” in the Bible you have to keep in mind that the Hebrew lb really refers to the seat of the intellect. So heart really means brain the way we understand it today:
“Give me understanding, O God, that I may keep your law and observe it with my whole heart.”
(Psalm 119:34 – Watchword for the Week of Sunday 7 September 2014)

Give me understanding, O God! That’s what God does: to provide us with understanding, resolve and courage. Taking heart is not just about a warm fuzzy feeling but clear analysis and action as well.

That’s why we are invited to at the Lord’s table: through bread and wine Jesus Christ seeks to enter our hearts, our minds, our bodies. Join us for Holy Communion on Sunday.

Jesus just isn’t a good Christian

Then Jesus told his disciples, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me.
(Matthew 16:24 – Watchword for the Week of Sunday 31 August 2014)

Nobody in their right mind likes following Jesus. For the first disciples that meant giving up everything: family, home, job, their very lives. Jesus was a radical prophet who thought kingdom come was right around the corner: “Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.” (Matthew 16:28). That is not a life I would want to live and every year there is one sect or the other proclaiming “the end is near”. Jesus told his disciples they will live to see kingdom come, really?

And this whole self-denial thing? What is that supposed to mean? The end of summer is such a wonderful season to affirm one’s own identity with all the labels we attach to ourselves: the schools we attend(ed), the sports teams we support, the party we support in the upcoming elections, you name it. Why would anyone want to give up the wonderfully crafted self-identity that took so much work to develop?

As a church we just can’t afford this kind of radicalism: Imagine Jesus were to rush into the sanctuary one Sunday, yelling at everybody to get out of their pews and follow him into the streets and proclaim kingdom come. Dear Lord Jesus, please check the bulletin: The service doesn’t conclude until the postlude, sit still and be a good Christian at least for this one hour on Sunday morning.

Maybe Jesus just isn’t a good Christian. And how could he be: He was a first century prophet expecting the world to end as soon as the Roman occupation of Israel was thrown off. He just didn’t have the experience of “doing church” for over two-thousand years. We had to learn to live with the fact that life as we know it, that our earth, that people with all their flaws, that institutions are just going to stick around for a while. We have created a home for ourselves, both physically and spiritually.

But then again: Maybe we just aren’t good followers of Christ. Thank God we have those ancient stories to keep us on our toes. A verse like today’s is a constant reminder, that we ought to be more than what we already know about ourselves: Don’t take yourself too seriously, allow your assumptions and your knowledge to be challenged by the still-speaking God.

Blessings,

Rev. Daniel Haas

Funeral Services for Dorothy Myska

Funeral services for Dorothy Myska will be held at St. John’s UCC-Rosenberg on Thursday, August 7, at 2:00 p.m. in the sanctuary.  Interment will be at Davis Greenlawn Memorial Park (B F Terry Blvd at Highway 59) with a reception immediately following back in the Parish Hall of the church.

Viewing will be held Wednesday, August 6 from 5:00-8:00 p.m. at Davis Greenlawn Funeral Home.

Please keep the Myska, Dresner, Robeson families in your thoughts and prayers.